Friday, March 23, 2012

Ever Responded To A Roommate Wanted Ad? The 5 CRAZIEST ROOMMATE REQUIREMENTS



Searching for a new roommate isn’t easy. There are plenty of nuts out there posting ads for new roommates and it’s often necessary to pick through the crazy to find the roommates that would be possible to live with. Here are some of the most unreasonable roommate requests found on craigslist.
1. Male or Female Roommate who doesn’t Eat Cooked Food
“You’re going to have to eat your food raw,” one particularly bossy ad read, “Because there are three other people in the house. Better yet. Keep your food out of the house.” Reading this ad made me wonder if the roomies weren’t actually looking for an outdoor dog rather than another human being who would be splitting the rent and utilities equally while taking their meal of uncooked food outside. Eating isn’t a privilege; it’s something we all do. Even your future roommate.
2. Perpetually Single Female
“Seeking another single female to rent the other room in my house. In my experience, relationships cause too much drama, so you can’t have one for the duration of the lease. No exceptions. No overnight guests.” Most singles don’t assume that they’re going to spend the rest of their lives alone, but this woman who wants you to rent out her spare room won’t have it any other way. While it isn’t unreasonable to request the overnight guests be kept to a minimum or that a new roomie come as a single unit and not a matched pair, demanding they forego the search for love for a yearlong lease is beyond bossy. People have a right to search for love, whether or not they occupy a bedroom in your house.
3. Must have Dog
There are lots of places for rent that don’t allow pets. Far fewer require them, but there are some people out there, looking for roommates on craigslist that are not only okay with the addition of an extra pet, they require it. “We are two twenty somethings who each have a dog of our own. We’d really like another dog, so you should already have one of your own.” They could just adopt another dog, it would seem, if that’s what they were really after.
4. Free Rent in Exchange…
There are many services a person can offer in exchange for reduced rent: gardening, repairs, care of animals, cooking or clean. But being a single female? I’m going to have to say that this request, which was promptly flagged for removal has crossed the line of legality. “Free room and board for a single woman to share a master bedroom,” the ad offered. While the advertiser never explicitly asked for anything in return, we can put 2 and 2 together.
5. Must Bend to my Will
“You’re going to need to do everything I tell you. I’ll tell you how to cook your meat and which spices you can use. I’ll tell you when you’ll watch TV. I’ll dictate your bedtime and check to be sure you’ve brushed your teeth twice a day. But hey, I’ve lowered the rent so that all this won’t matter.” Last time I checked, we were all creatures with quirky behaviors and strong wills. Making unreasonable demands on a roommate and not allowing them to have any issues of their own shows not only a lack of insight into how relationships work, but a lack of respect for your future roommate.


Article via mynewplace 

Tuesday, March 20, 2012

How to Deal With 7 Habits of Highly Offensive Roommates


Is your roommate driving you crazy?   Worse yet, is your roomie completely oblivious to the fact that he or she is annoying?   Just in case you're curious how your situation compares, here's a list of the top seven roommate complaints from the book My Roommate Is Driving Me Crazy!      
 
 
1.   Sex in the room.   Oh, the joy of walking in on this scene!   Some people are considerate enough to give you warning; others hook up while you're in the room. 

Solution: If it becomes a repetitive situation definitely have a talk with your roommate about the need of clear warning signs. Some people place socks on door knobs or post color tapes outside the door. Whatever method you both agree upon, it's certainly something that can be calmly settled.
             
2.  "Borrowing."   This person assumes that just because you room together, she can eat your food, wear your clothes, use your computer, or even "borrow" your car - without asking. 

 Solution: Again, communication is of essence. If the person is in the normal spectrum of considerate behavior, they will feel a little embarrassed that you know, apologize and agree to ask first. If not, resort to a little fake extreme warning and tell them at the next missing item you're calling the cops. They'll stop.
 
3.   Total slob.   The slob feels right at home amongst piles of dirty laundry, dishes stacked in the sink, decaying fast food containers and a few maggots. 

 Solution: This unfortunately is something you might never be able to change. Slobs eventually come to after years of exhausting search parties for something they need. And this usually doesn't happen until they're in their mid 20's. Anyways... what you could try to do is to tell the slob to keep the mess on their side of the room or apartment. Along the lines, try to help them organize, sometimes this is all it takes, someone who calmly helps.
   
4.   Hygiene issues.   Either this person can't detect his own special aroma, or he just wants the place to himself by ignoring the basic rules of hygiene: shower daily (with soap), wash your hair, brush your teeth, use deodorant, invest in Odor-Eaters, go light on the cologne/perfume, and do laundry weekly (including bed sheets).  

Solution:  Keep your head high and pray to God the persona accidentally falls inside a tub filled with water and soap. Or, simply confront your roommate about it, gently putting the cards on the table. In the end, no one really enjoys being told they stink, so some type of action should follow after.
                          
5.   Poor communicator.   This person insists that you are the problem and let's you know by telling everyone else but you.    

Solution:  Firmly, but not loudly tell this person that it makes more sense for the sake of the living situation that they address you. After all, nothing will change by telling everyone else but the person in question. Put the problem on the spotlight and come up with a compromise.    
 
6.   Personal space invader.   Not only does this roomie stand WAY too close, he's loud, obnoxious, and assumes everyone loves his music blasting at top volume.   

Solution:  Sometimes the best thing to do is fight fire with fire. Give the roommate a taste of their own medicine and then ask if they liked it. What comes after should be pretty simple.

7.   ALWAYS right.   Compromise?  What's that?  You wouldn't have any trouble getting along with this roommate if you would just agree that she's right, all the time, on every single issue.  What's not to like? 


Solution: This person is going to be extremely difficult to reason with. After the first try, if all goes wrong you'll just have to agree to disagree unless the problems directly affect you. The most important thing is to remain calm and say something along the lines, "Look you and I are different and we know it. I don't agree with what you're doing or saying, but if we have to live together for now, let's make the best of it. What do you think needs to be done in order to improve our living conditions?" If you get only snarky responses, perhaps it's time to consider moving. 










List via myroommateisdrivingmecrazy
Solutions by Roomster

Monday, March 19, 2012

The Politics of Food Sharing Among Roommates



Many a friendship has soured from the overstepping of bounds when one assumes the generosity of a roommate and “borrows” a snack from the fridge. Living with other people has many advantages; cheaper rent, cheaper utilities, and a potentially lower food expense.

That said, if the roommates don’t clearly lay out from the start what food they expect to share, bitterness, passive-aggressive notes, and even open hostility may ensue. When you first move in with roommates, among the many things that should be candidly discussed, is the protocol of food sharing and use of kitchen facilities.

Have a meeting. Talk about what each person’s eating habits are in order to determine what kinds of food could be considered “staples” and purchased jointly. Eggs, bread, milk, butter, coffee, sugar, bananas, onions, garlic, canned beans, and rice, for example, are all things that I have shared equally with roommates in the past. They are easily shared if housemates agree to promptly reimburse the person who purchased the items last. Also, this meeting is a good time to discuss cleanliness of the kitchen, since your idea of “timely clean-up” might not always meet other’s expectations.


Save your receipts. If you are purchasing food that is shared with your housemates, make sure to save the receipts.  With the addition of utilities and rent, keeping track of money changing hands can be tricky. Fortunately, there are sites online that help housemates calculate these very debts.
   
Or use the “karma” approach. If keeping track of receipts is not your strong suit, there is always the “karma” approach, where grocery bills, chores, and meals cooked are repaid in turn by each person in the house. Note: this only works in theory unless each person in the house is truly open about telling others what they feel is owed. Little gestures go a long way in a shared living situation; offer to share a meal with a hungry housemate or offer to do the shopping and it will come back to you twofold.

Make labeling your food an exception, not a rule. If you are able to decide with your roommates what food you will all share, then there is only a need to label food if it is a special or personal item and doesn’t fall into the “shared food” category. Keeping a roll of masking tape and a permanent marker hanging on the fridge makes it easy to label food that you want to save as your own.  Or, instead of writing your name, buy a multi-pack of colored stickers, like they use at yard sales, and have each person in the house have their own color with which they can “tag” their food.

Another approached in a house with only a few housemates is to designate one section of the refrigerator to each person in the house and a section for shared foods. And if you are dying to taste someone’s tagged item, ASK! You may be pleasantly surprised. Just remember, generosity can quickly run dry when not reciprocated.

Cook together. Cooking dinner with friends is fun, and if you don’t know your housemates well, eating together is a great way to become better acquainted.





Source myfirstapartment

Thursday, March 15, 2012

Splitwise Will Ease Roommate Problems


You and you're roommates are probably responsible enough to set up a payment plan for your apartment/house. But then again, maybe you have no plan at all. Regardless of your current situation, there's an online application which can ease the debate on who pays for what.

The account is free, and all you have to do is invite all of your roommates to the application and set the payments up. This way, everything is agreed upon when the payment plans are set up. The great part about this application is that all of the information can be pulled up on one page.

Check out Splitwise

Famous College Roommates


Currently in college? Living with a roommate? There's definitely a chance that you'll be on one of these lists in about 10 to 20 years. Most of these roommates probably didn't know they were going to be on this list either, but here are our top 5 surprising roommates.

1. Tommy Lee Jones (Actor) and Al Gore (Former Vice President) - Harvard University


2. Robin Williams (Actor) and Christopher Reeves (Actor) - Julliard


3. Owen Wilson (Actor) and Wes Anderson (Actor) - University of Texas

4. Charlie Weis (Kansas Football Coach) and Joe Montana (Quarterback) - Notre Dame


5. Luis UbiƱas (President of Ford Foundation) and Conan O'Brien (Comedian) - Harvard University

SNL Digital Short: Megan's Roommate


Saturday Night Live aired this digital short last year using Megan Fox and Optimus Prime, from Transformers, as roommates. Andy Samberg falls in a really awkward situation. This is hysterical.


Hopefully, none of this happens to you with your roommates or future roommates!



Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Evolution of Education



Here's another cool image that might be interesting to you. Like the "Life Hacks" post we put up yesterday, this post has plenty of images and fun facts that'll keep you occupied for the next 5 to 10 minutes.


Monday, March 12, 2012

So, You're Looking For A Roommate?


You're obviously here to figure out how you can find a roommate for tomorrow, next week, or even this upcoming semester at school. If this is your first time looking for a roommate, all of the brand new choices and possibilities available to you might be overwhelming. "Where do I start?" You're probably asking yourself that question right now. Here are some tips, provided by Roomster, that may help.

1. Ask Your Friends


You've probably done this already or may have brought up the topic of "roommates," once or twice this year. It's probably one of the easiest ways to find a roommate but can also be very difficult. If you were able to find interested friends, great! You should check out our previous post of how to draft a "Roommate Contract". Regardless of how close you and your friend are, you're going to need it. You want to avoid this situation at all costs. It would be a nightmare for both you and your roommate, if you had to change living arrangements due to avoidable problems.

Again, asking your friends is probably the easiest way to get the word out there, but there are a few issues that may arise. To try and avoid these problems, you can formally draft the contract mentioned above, or just casually talk. There's no harm in letting your roommate, a friend in this case, know what you can tolerate and what you cannot.



PROSCONS
Simple, just ask!Arrangements can be difficult.
You and your roommate are
friends. There's trust!
Conflicts can arise, when living
in the same living space.
You can find out immediately
whether or not your friend
can be a roommate.
You probably have limited
amount of friends in the area. It
may be harder to find someone.


2. Use Social Media

Let's say that you've asked your group of friends. There were about a dozen friends you asked, but all of them have said that they don't need or aren't looking for a roommate (for whatever the reason). The next step will be to do what every person does best, use social media!





PROSCONS
Easy to write.Again, arrangements can be
difficult.
All you have to do is wait.If your friends don't see it on
the news feed, they might
miss over it.
Can spark conversation
and get friends of
your friends involved!
Again, smaller network of
interested people.


3. Use our website, Roomster!

Both methods, asking your friends and using social media, requires a lot of work on your part. Wouldn't it be nice to use a website that could do the work for you? The answer should be "Yes." Roomster is a social network for people looking for a roommate. Pretty much combines the best of both worlds: You get people who truly want you, AND you get a roommate who will be compatible to your personality and preferences. Where to start? It's easy! All you have to do is set up your own account, and follow the steps. Check out Roomster now!




PROS
Easy instructions
Customizable profile and questions for your potential roommate
Direct contact from interested people

Wednesday, March 7, 2012

Funny Roommate Note :)

Here is a Funny Roommate Note we posted couple of days ago in Facebook. Our followers liked it so much that we wanted to share it on our blog as well. 

Have fun and good luck finding a roommate!!



Tuesday, March 6, 2012

Useful Tip: Roommate Contracts


This picture? Sure, it's funny... but is that really what you want to wake up to every now and then? The answer should be no.

Here are Roomster, we make it our business not only to provide the tools necessary for you to find a roommate, but also to help you communicate with that roommate, once you find him/her. 

Below we'd like to show you an example of what a Roommate Contract looks like. This contract can be accommodated to whatever reasonable rules you'd like to make clear. Contracts are always a good source for keeping the peace and the define the responsibilities of each person living in the apartment or house.


If you have any questions or comments, let us know in the comment section below!





Source occ.uark.edu


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